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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  March 2, 2010 3:05am-4:30am EST

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it's tough out here. the days are long. the nights get lonely. but we have a job to do. we have a commitment to our country to our families our children and to each other. the uso is a bond that we share to help us stay close here at home and far away. [male announcer] to find out how you can help visit us at uso dot org the uso until every one comes home. of cars, some of which sped up uncontrollably. toyota nouns its february sales figures today. they are expected to show
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seriouous declines because of those recalls. meanwhile, general motors is recalling over 1 million chevy and pontiac compact cars because of steering problems. the affected models are 2005 to 2010 chevy cobalts, 2007 to 2010 pontiac g-5s and other models sold in mexico and canada. gm says the cars are safe but could be harder to steer under 15 miles per hour. new regulations aimed at preventing another financial crisis are moving toward the finish line on capitol hill. senate negotiators are close to a deal that would create a new independent body within the federal reserve. that entity would oversee consumer financial products ranging from everything from credit cards to mortgages. here is a look at your tuesday forecast. rain and mountain snow from california and nevada up to washington and oregon. wet and windy in the southeast. severe storms in florida with rain stretching to the carolinas. a wintry mix in atlanta, charlotte and knoxville. tennessee moving into d.c.,
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philly and new york tonight. >> mostly 40s in the northeast today. 83 in miami. 30s across the midwest. 50s for much of the rockies and the northwest today. 75 in phoenix. and 48 in colorado springs. been awhile since we've had a good daredevil to tell you about this morning. and this was a rip-roaring leap into history by an american daredevil in australia. >> look at that. straight up evel knevil. biker seth henslow made the longest jump on a harley-davidson. he immediately broke his own record with another amazing jump, this time just shy of 1 yes, sir feet. the harley as you can probably tell was slightly modified with dirt bike suspension and even some different handle bars. >> in case you noticed that landing was pretty hard. he says he landed so hard the impact actually crashed the pai -- cracked the paint on the bike. >> as long as it didn't crack him. >> right. we'll be right back with more "world news now."
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medicare guide and customized rate quote. welcome back to "world news
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now." more than 3 billion prescriptions are filled nationwide each year and three-quarters of them are handled by big-chain drugstores. >> how often do you take home the wrong pills? abc's brian ross investigated pharmacy errors three years ago and now has a follow-up. >> reporter: beth hitly was an active mother of three in lake land, florida, when she became the victim of a prescription error. >> i heard her screaming. for help. she was on the floor in the bathroom. >> reporter: the blood thinner pills beth got from walgreens were ten times the prescribed dose. she was crippled by a massive stroke, forced to stop treatment for early stage breast cancer, no longer able to care for her children. >> they're growing up without me. >> reporter: it turns out the error was made by a high school student who went from working at a movie theater to being a pharmacy technician at walgreens. >> i should have typed it with "1 milligram."
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>> how did you type isn't it. >> with "10 milligrams." >> reporter: beth hitly died from her untreated breast cancer three years ago. last week a florida court upheld an almost $26 million judgment against walgreens, one of the biggest ever for a prescription error. critics say the big chains have brought a fast food culture to the drugstore business. >> forgetting to put your fries in the bag isn't going to lead to any harm. obviously we're dealing with something much more serious with medicine. >> reporter: to keep up the pace chains rely heavily on pharmacy technicians for whom there is no national age restriction or training standard. in another lawsuit a kroger's pharmacy technician testified she had only two hours of training. >> i really felt like i had just been thrown into the lion's den, you know, and i was just going to have to figure it out on my own. >> reporter: the drugstore trade group says technicians and the prescriptions they fill are closely supervised by licensed
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pharmacists. >> making sure that patients are safe has always been first and foremost. >> can you learn all you need to know in two hours? >> i couldn't answer that question because i'm not familiar with the two-hour training program, however -- >> have you ever heard of anything like that no, i haven't. >> reporter: a report publish last year based on an abc news undercover investigation found errors in one of five prescriptions filled. major chains treat their error rates as a closely held secret and there is no federal requirement to publicly report prescription errors, even those involving serious injury or death. >> why would the public need to know those and why would they want to solve the problem? >> you can't tell me if the number of accidents or errors has been up or down? >> principal causes? >> i can't, because it's not a requirement for mandatory reporting. >> reporter: walgreens had no comment on the $26 million judgment in the beth hitly case. but in a statement it said it works continuously to strive for
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accuracy and quality in filling its prescriptions. brian ross, abc news, new york. >> all this after so much of the process has been automated. it used to be doctors were the cause of the problems because they would write sloppily prescriptions out and that would mess up some pharmacy technicians. now you've got people who clearly haven't been trained. >> pharmacies are trying to go one up on that. they're saying with some pills you can get paperwork on some of the paperwork will show you a diagram of what the pill should look like so you can hold it up and say, this pill looks different, and that's the difference in milligram sizes. >> sounds like a good idea. coming up, the monumental task of keeping up on registered sex offenders.
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a utah judge says the man accused of kidnapping elizabeth smart is faking his mental illness and should go on trial. and a trial date should be set
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in a few weeks. elizabeth smart was just 14 years old when she was kidnapped from her home in salt lake city. the man held on suspicion of rape and murder after a san diego teen's disappearance could be charged today. >> while the search continues for chelsea king, police arrested john albert gardner, a convicted sex offender, who has been connected to other attacks. >> martin bashir reports on how difficult it is to monitor california's sex offenders. >> reporter: the picturesque county of santa clara at the southern end of san francisco bay is home to silicon valley, and 3,000 sex offenders. >> okay, get with your team leaders, figure out your strategies, and let's go. >> reporter: policing them is in the hands of these 25 law enforcement officers. >> we're going to use two vehicles. i'll take three, i'll take dan with me. >> reporter: this federally funded task force is known as s.a.f.e. sexual assault felony enforcement. their mission is clear.
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>> these are people who have just gotten out of prison or jail, who have a history, who are likely to reoffend. the recidivism rate for sex offenders is the highest of any type of crime. >> reporter: these random visits are designed to confirm that the sex offender is living where he says he is and they're obeying the detailed conditions that accompanied their early release from prison. the case of jacy lee dugard has been a chase ning one for the state of california with its 83,000 sex offenders. she was allegedly kidnapped and forced to conceive two children by philip garrido, a known sex offender. he was visited by a parole officer who never checked the backyard where she was held for almost two decades. >> it's a tragic case. could things have been done differently? absolutely, and i think that's why this team is so important is to make sure things like that don't happen in the future. >> reporter: santa clara county is not giving any of its
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offenders such leniency. so, first stop on today's sweep is the home of a 62-year-old former classroom assistant. he served a five-year prison sentence for multiple crimes against a 10-year-old girl. as he sits down the s.a.f.e. team searches every room of the apartment. he's been on parole for over two years. and this is only the second visit to his home. despite his attempt to play down the offenses, he must also wear a gps tracking device to ensure he's never in a location that places him close to children. >> you say you just hugged a student in school? >> lewd and lascivious with a child under 14. possession of obscene matter depicting a child in sexual acts. annoying and molesting a child. >> you were found guilty of possession of pornography, child pornography.
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you said earlier you only committed one offense. >> that was sort of the meat and potatoes of the whole thing. >> when it all stacks up, it looks like you're a pedophile. you're interested in being intimate with children. >> well, that was the suggestion, yeah. >> that's not true? >> no. >> were you told that you were not to purchase children's clothing? >> yes. >> you're going to be taken into custody today for violating special condition of parole stating you shall not possess or have access to children's clothing, toys or games or other similar material related to children's interests. >> do you think that these individuals can be rehabilitated? >> i don't know. but we find that the same people commit the same kinds of crimes. >> reporter: as they prepared to take our violator back to jail, i had to ask him the obvious
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question. is it possible that you were planning to groom a child with those toys? >> no. >> with that costume? >> those were just some of the things that i had over the years. >> were you planning to groom another child? >> oh, no. >> reporter: fortunately in this instance the s.a.f.e. team may have prevented him from sexually abusing another child. and worryingly, he only had five months to go before he would be released from all his parole conditions. >> once the supervision's gone, he's on his own. so that's worrisome to me. >> reporter: of the 20 visits today, most were found to be complaplying with their conditi. two were not and they're now back in jail. the s.a.f.e. team closes down for the night, knowing there will be plenty of work come morning. >> the sad reality is there's the likelihood there's a sexual offender living in your neighborhood. of course one way to find out the national sex offender registry, several states of a
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about switching to lunesta. discover a restful lunesta night. "world news now" delivers your "morning papers." >> it's no surprise "american idol" is infectious. everybody loves the show. >> it's like a fungus that just grows. >> fungus is an apt word choice. who knew that it was so infectious it's actually being done at prison. take a look at this. it's pretty unbelievable. this is what's happening. they say this was happening on a basketball court. 14 inmates, you see they're all sitting in rows, they have their own annual corrections idol contest. it was a singing, rapping and poetry competition meant to showcase miami-dade corrections inmates' talents while building their self-image. a lot of these guys rap about how they ended up there, they rap about what they want to change in their life, what they
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have changed. it's kind of an interesting story. >> i wonder if they have a british prisoner who says, that was pitchy, it sounded like you were on a cruise ship. >> officers who actually sit at a small table under a tent at center court. probably with big coke cups right in front of them. >> i have any number of jokes to make about that. since a large portion of our audience is, in fact, prison inmates -- >> who like to write us. >> who like to send us mail. usually bizarre mail. we love you, thanks for watching. >> thank you and keep singing. >> that's right. it's a miracle! he can walk again! little hopper. you've got to see this loveable, cute little picture of hopper born without any front legs. so he couldn't walk like the other puppies. look what they went and did. >> bionic dog. >> made a tries sickcycle out o.
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he's not p-p-puppy power like on that cartoon when we were kids. >> it's interesting to watch him hopping along. >> he's a cutie. >> he as cutie. everyone in new york secretly thinks they have been in this guy's cab. there was a guy who overcharged 574 passengers in a single month. you're probably thinking, how much could he possibly have overcharged? they think this guy earned $11,499 for trips that month alone. >> how did he do that? >> the way they even found out about it is even more interesting. apparently officials in new york now have gps technology that requires all cabs to sort of determine where they went and what the rate fare was. so what he was doing is taking this suburban rate, which is double the in-city rate, and charging people who didn't know better. like all the tourists who are here. >> i can see it. >> i shake my fist at him. >> i do too. >> because i've probably been in that cab.
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international aid arrives in chile as officials warn the death toll will rise when crews reach hard-hit areas. plus, search for survivors. the american rescue team and its grueling mission in a new disaster zone just days after returning from haiti. and, he's back. >> good to be home! >> jay leno returns to "the tonight show." a look back at how late-night tv has changed over the years. it's tuesday, march 2nd. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> isn't it better to see than that shot? >> some last-minute adjustments. before going on the air. >> for the fans. mom and dad. >> is the belt sitting right? had a big dinner or something? i'm just saying. >> you're the only man who could
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ask a woman that. good morning and thanks for being with us. i'm vinita nair. >> the last time i'll ask. i'm jeremy hubbard. scuffles and looting on the streets of chile this morning as international aid arrives. secretary of state hillary clinton is bringing 20 satellite phones and a technician during her stop in santiago today. >> the death toll has climbed to 723 and could grow when search crews reach hard-hit areas. our jeffrey kofman reports on the destruction from near the quake's epicenter. >> reporter: from santiago, a journey south is an unfolding odyssey into a world of destruction and devastation. first, a collapsed bridge. we are now about 45 miles south of santiago and we're beginning to see the first signs of the extensive damage from this quake. take a look behind me. this bridge was built to withstand earthquakes but clearly it did not. but that was an anomaly. it wasn't until we arrived in curico, an inland city 125 miles south of santiago, that we encountered the first extensive damage.
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up the street we found long lines at the banks. people desperate to get cash. we couldn't help noticing a teary-eyed andrea pelosa. she told us she'd been at her home in a tiny coastal village when the quake shocked her and her son from sleep. we ran from the house, she says, just as a wave 30 feet high came and washed it into the ocean with no warning. as we left town, we passed this truck filled with coffins. the owner told us he was delivering an order for 46. it's all because of the tragedy, the earthquake, he says, adding he has many more orders to deliver. the coffins were heading south and so were we, to the city of talca, the wine region. at as we approached, evidence of the quik's violence was suddenly everywhere. badly broken pavement and old arched bridge destroyed. yet we were astonished to see paving crews already hard at work repairing the broken road. in talca, we found mothers and children lined up for the first
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bottles of drinking water they'd had since saturday. we need food too, she says. we also found buildings ripped apart like toys in the hands of an impest wus child. more than 100 people died in this city. further south in the city of concepcion, close to the epicenter, fires that ignited after the quake still burn. and looters tussled with police. in this neighborhood, local residents armed themselves and set up checkpoints to keep the looters out. this woman says the authorities told us to do whatever is necessary. residents here in talca are sleeping under the stars. if they do have homes that are still standing they are afraid to go inside because of the aftershocks. i never thought that what we saw on the news in haiti just a few weeks ago, he says, would happen to us here in chile. but it did. and now they have to pick up the pieces of their shattered homes and their shattered lives. i'm jeffrey kofman in talca, chile. and now to that other quake
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zone. the last two american missionaries still being held in haiti could go free as early as today. a haitian judge tells the associated press he's likely to release the pair after a hearing. the missionary group from idaho was accused of trying to take children out of the country illegally. eight other detained americans have already been released. crews in san diego county are using all means available in the search for missing 17-year-old chelsea king. they were in boats, helicopters and on foot yesterday combing an area of lake shoreline. king has been missing since thursday when it's believed she went running in a local park. 30-year-old john gardner, registered sex offender, has been arrested in connection with her disappearance. despite a barrage of angry phone calls and bomb threats to his office, kentucky senator jim bunning is putting up a roadblock on government spending. he's brought congress to a standstill on the issue. john hendren joins us from washington with the fallout. good morning, john.
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>> reporter: good morning, jeremy and vinita. sometimes a senator's attention-getting move gets more attention than expected. that may have been the case when a senator from kentucky blocked a routine bill from moving on capitol hill. senator jim bunning was on the move. >> excuse me, this is a senator-only elevator. >> reporter: as he headed to work, bunning, who dodged questions from abc's jonathan karl, was stopping thousands of other workers from heading to their jobs by putting a hold on the highway trust fund. he says he wants the projects paid for first. >> we cannot keep adding to the debt. >> reporter: bunning's hold has stopped 2,000 federal transportation workers from going to work, furloughed with no pay. among them inspectors overseeing federal projects. >> where was my friend from kentucky when we had two wars that were unpaid for during the bush administration? tax cuts that cost more than $1 trillion, unpaid for? >> reporter: the lack of inspectors has shut down 41 construction projects nationwide
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and denied states the $153 million a day in federal reimbursements they were expecting for state highway projects. that's left bunning facing heat from house speaker nancy pelosi -- >> a lot has happened because one senator has held up the extensions bills. one senator can hold up everything. >> reporter: and from commuters across the nation. >> i think he's out of touch, obviously, with the quality of life issues that he's affecting. >> reporter: lawmakers expect the impasse to be broken within the week. bunning's hold doesn't just block transportation funding, it also blocks money to extend health care and unemployment benefits to jobless workers. jeremy and vinita? >> our thanks to john hendren. one more political note this morning. former congressman harold ford jr. says he is not running for the u.s. senate. ford has been gauging support ahead of a possible primary challenge against new york democratic senator gildebrand. writing in today's "new york times" ford says he doesn't want
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to divide his party. many top democrats had urged ford not to run. time for a look to tuesday's forecast. windy in the southeast with severe storms in florida, from orlando to miami down to key west. rain from south georgia to the coastal carolinas today. a mix of rain and snow for atlanta, charlotte, and knoxville, tennessee. rain and mountain snow from california up to washington. >> 50s from seattle to sacramento. 27 in fargo. mostly 30s across the midwest. 40s from boston to baltimore. 53 in dallas. 49 in new orleans. i've always been disappointed that this mode of transportation has not taken off quicker than it has. but perhaps now -- it's not a car or boat or plane but it can take you where you want to go by land, sea and air. >> it is a souped-up hovercraft. a fast and furious machine that james bond would love to add to his own creatio a new zealand man created it to work like a regular hovercraft. when you hit 45 miles an hour this takes to the skies. how cool is that.
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and the wings can be removed when you don't need them. >> that is awesome. the inventor took more than a decade to develop the flying hovercraft and now he's trying to sell it online. we know the hover-round is popular because they're one of our big advertisers. if only the hover-craft -- >> i notice the cut-away from that video before the landing, that wh h tbefore the landing, oh! no, that was the takeoff. >> they don't land, apparently, that's the problem. > ah we'll be r1"wd ne let me tell you about a very important phone call i made. when i got my x medicare car, i realized i needed x an aarp... medicare supplement insurance card, too. medicare is one of the great things about turning 65, in fact, it only pays up to .80% of your part b expenses. if you're already on or eligible for medicare, call now to find out how an aarp...
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they just returned home from the earthquake zone in haiti and now the elite search and rescue team from southern california is heading out again. >> the specialized group of doctors, engineers and search
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dogs going to chile to look for trapped earthquake survivors there. carlos grande reports from los angeles. >> reporter: they're packing up and getting ready to move out. l.a. county's specially trained and equipped urban search and rescue task force. they have to be prepared for anything and bring with them all the fuel and supplies they'll need. altogether about 55,000 pounds of tools and medical equipment to conduct round the clock search and rescue operations. >> when we arrive, we'll immediately deploy a reconnaissance team. they will go out and meet with the government of chile and then we'll see how we can assist them. whether it's technical search or whether it's canine or just supporting the rescue operations that they have ongoing at the time. >> reporter: he won't be going to chile. he was in haiti for 17 days and took part in several rescues. the members of task force 2 have been involved in every major disaster over the last decade. in new york city at the world trade center after the 9/11
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attacks, helping victims in new orleans after hurricane katrina, and most recently in haiti helping victims after that devastating earthquake. some of the equipment from that operation just got here. >> a lot of the guys that went to haiti are going to go to chile. we transport a lot of equipment by boat back. in fact, we just received a shipment back from haiti. so guys are grabbing their personal gear and making sure they're all in order. >> reporter: the task force members have had just enough rest after haiti to be ready for this next challenge. they say it's all about saving lives and helping others. and what they learn in haiti and chile could one day help us here at home. >> we train here on a daily basis. train, train, train. now to actually be able to apply it hands-on and actually see the different rescue -- different techniques they can come up with and actually learning to work better together as a team in actual live situations where they're away from home in another country. in just a moment we'll take you back to the beginnings of
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the late-night talk show wars. >> how jay leno and david letterman's ultra-competitive battle began over 16 years ago.
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i'm jay leno, your host at least for a while. got to admit i'm little bit nervous. not because it's my first night back. because i know dave and oprah are watching. >> welcome to "the late show." my name is david letterman. same time, same host. >> david letterman, jay leno, going back to his old time slot, trading barbs as the titans of late-night talk once again in direct competition. >> it reminds us of the tv battle that started more than 16 years ago when lenny took over for johnny carson and letterman moved over to cbs. >> vault coverage from 1993. >> reporter: very, very short history of television. johnny carson's swan song may have indeed before one of those seismic shifts. >> i bid you a very heartfelt good night. >> reporter: carson so ruled the late-night roost for so long his departure has set off a mad
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scramble to carve up nbc's ancient and profitable empire. >> jay leno! >> arsenio! >> you're seeing real entertainment competition. johnny was taken on many times. you know. dick haver tried, joey bishop tried, various syndicators tried, merv griffin tried. johnny was supreme. nobody ever took johnny. >> i don't feel any pressure. >> reporter: with piles of money at stake, nearly $700 million in estimated advertising revenue, the network hype leading up to the letterman/leno late-night sweepstakes was, well, hysterical. >> let me ask you, then, are you at all nervous about dave? >> no. i think -- >> i've never seen it this thick. the pollution of hype was really so thick you almost had to wear a gas mask to survive it. i've never seen it happen to this extent. where day after day you had people who were employees of news divisions, in effect
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standing up and saluting an entertainment figure who just happened to be employed by the same network. >> reporter: since monday things have settled down. last night, for instance, letterman attracted about 20% of the tv audience. "the tonight show," 13%. and "nightline" which airs during the first half hour of the time slot, received 18%. but as the old carson empire crumbles, some critics do see a fundamental change. cbs carving out a lucrative territory of its own. the young viewers who make many advertisers drool. >> cbs has never had anything in late night before. they've never had any success at all. and i think they were going into this feeling, if they did just modestly well, they were ahead. the fact is dave did extremely well this week and he holds out the potential to do very, very well. you have to remember, his station lineup is not nearly as strong as jay's and he's going against "the tonight show," he's going against the titan. and he's doing extremely well. he did extremely well in the first week.
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>> reporter: even wall street caught letterman fever. this week, cbs stock shot up. though dave can't quite claim all the credit. analysts have been touting the stock even before his debut. >> for the week overall, the stock was up an amount that is equivalent to roughly $150 million of increased stock market capitalization. and we think the letterman show was indeed a good part of that. >> the chevy chase show. >> reporter: the late-night landscape gets even more crowded and complicated next week. comedian chevy chase launches a new show on the fox network. the following week conan o'brien, a comedy writer, tries to fill letterman's slot on nbc. conservative talker rush limbaugh is another late-night wild card. so far critics say the syndicated arsenio hall show appears to be the big loser. the proliferation of talk in the wee hours has led to a fishing derby in the limited talent tool of tv guests.
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>> there is a certain frenzy i think especially in the initial weeks of these shows to have the best guest. >> reporter: judy hoffland, a hollywood agent, detects a new nastiness in her phone calls. >> hi. fine, thanks, how are you? everybody thinks their show is the best show to be on. it's a little bit of the hardball, if you decide to go do, you know, this other show, then we don't want you on our show. >> reporter: helen gorman kushnik, the former jay leno executive producer famous for her hardball, believes the guests don't really matter that much. >> these shows are not about the guests. that's what everybody doesn't seem to understand. yeah, if you have a great guest you can get your rating up for that night or whatever. but that's not to me the point. the point is to do a good show. which means people tune in to watch the hosts of the show. >> reporter: the most optimistic
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network executives pray all the new attention attracts millions of new viewers, not to mention advertisers, to the post-primetime period. but the television graveyard is already chock full of former late-night hosts. >> it's really far too premature to really predict who's going to win. it's very difficult. you really have to wait. >> reporter: for all the handicapping and hyperbole about the winners and losers in late-night tv, even jay leno likes to point out that the losers are still likely to walk away with a couple of million dollars. and no matter what happens to johnny carson's empire in the midnight hour, all the rest of us have to lose is a little sleep. this is chris bury for "nightline" in washington. >> well-put, chris. you heard references to late-night hosts. arsenio hall, his show did not last much past -- >> i loved that show. >> you were the only one. no. you weren't the only one. it was popular for a while and disappeared not long after that story. chevy chase's show, the critics
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hated it, it barely lasted at all. rush limbaugh's show, they talked about that, it did last for quite a while. to sleep d you're stilg in the middle of the night, why would you go one more round using it ? you don't need a rematch-- but a re-think-- with lunesta. lunesta is different. it keys into receptors that support sleep, setting your sleep process in motion. lunesta helps you get the restful sleep you need. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving or engaging in other activities while asleep without remembering it the next day have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness and morning drowsiness. stop fighting with your sleep. get a free 7-night trial on-line and ask your doctor
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so what do you think? fresh. [ female announcer ] for a fresh breath feeling that lasts up to 5 times longer, there's new scope outlast. the host of a british children's tv show is the first woman to kayak the length of the amazon river. >> pretty amazing. 26-year-old helen skelton at one point didn't think she'd make it. but as the bbc's david sill lit toe reports, her 2,000-mile trek made history. >> good morning! this is the amazon calling! this is my home for the next six weeks. >> reporter: she started off full of beans but with little idea about what she was about to endure.
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in this 2,010 mile amazon journey. >> i managed to get blistered, both hands, already. >> reporter: and this was just the end of day one. at the end of week one it was rather worse. >> it just feels so -- weak. fat head. i feel sick. it's tough. i so wanted to do it because it's tough. >> reporter: the next five weeks were equally challenging. >> i'm only halfway. just really tired. i'm closer to the end than the beginning now. so i can't stop. when the andrea sinks it takes hours to fix. surprise number two, sickness and diarrhea both strike team
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amazon. >> it hurt. really, really hurt. >> reporter: but she made it. and while it was obvious it was tough, even the experts were impressed. >> i'm sure she's absolutely shattered. it really aches your shoulders and all your muscles. i'm sure her backside's probably hurting quite a lot as well from sitting down. i think she did about 90 miles a day which is just amazing. i get a sore backside paddling just two hours a day. >> reporter: there it is. six weeks, 2,000 miles, and 50 meters of blister tape. david sillito, bbc news. >> as if that was not impressive enough they say she finished early because she didn't do her traditional 30 miles a day of kayaking toward the end there, she was doing 50 miles a day. can you imagine. how sore her body must have been. >> they say her rings didn't fit anymore, she gained so much muscle mass her rings didn't fit. again, she's a children's tv host. i never saw captain kangaroo try that.
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disaster zone. fighghts break out as food and water supplies reach some of the hardest-hit areas three days after that destructive earthquake in chile. plus, change of heart. why some democratic holdouts in the house may be ready to support health care reform. and, he glides on air, leaps from tall buildings, and does cartwheels off of trees. no, it's not superman. he's the extreme biker. it's tuesday, march 2nd. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> like susan boyle he is a youtube sensation from scotland. i'd like to see old subo try some of those tricks. >> i immediately thought, why
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not connect the two? she's looking for love. >> well, perhaps -- >> the location is the same. >> i hadn't thought about that. we've made a love match this morning on "world news now." we will show you the biker coming up. in just a fy minutes. good morning on this tuesday. i'm jeremy hubbard. >> i'm vinita nair. chile is putting out the call for help this morning as the sheer scope of destruction from the quake becomes more evident. >> secretary of state clinton arrives today with much-needed communication systems but the list of needs is long. david wright reports from the capital of santiago. >> reporter: a terrifying jolt. then the earth started to rumble. at 3:30 a.m., security cameras were rolling. in a pizzeria, the lights flickered. the ceiling started to collapse. it was every man for himself. outside, sparks flew from the damaged transformers. cars were literally tossed from the roads. then huge waves stirred up by the quake crashed ashore without warning.
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an amateur videographer was rolling just after a 30-foot wave swamped a town. chilean tv showed three children who were traveling along the coast with their mother, who died in the quake. they're now frantically looking for their dad. please, the news anchor pleaded, if someone could send us any sign of him, we know where these kids are. natalie hernandez, who works for american airlines, showed us what used to be her apartment. >> we started saying good-bye to each other. we thought this was going to fall. we thought the apartment was going to fall down. >> reporter: in the city of concepcion near the epicenter, one brand new 15-story high-rise toppled like a felled tree. inside, a father and his 7-year-old daughter hugged each other as they fell 13 floors. this is what the building looked like before the quake. the base of the ruined structure, rescue workers cut windows into the concrete, searching for survivors, while a chilean reporter looked on. chile enforces strict building codes because of the seismic activity here.
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when they start a new building here they start with earthquakes in mind. >> yes, it's by law. >> reporter: the vast majority of buildings survived unscathed. developers of the ones who didn't could be held criminally viable. >> they were below the standards. >> somebody was cutting corners? >> yes, someone. we have to investigate who. but someone was cutting corners. >> reporter: but there are more immediate priorities. looting continues to be a problem in some of the worst-hit areas. vigilantes manned barricades trying to keep the looters out. the chilean president has put out an urgent call for field hospitals, emergency kitchens, water purification systems, electric generators and temporary bridges. they also need rescue teams here to relieve the exhausted first responders. the government here is now blaming chile's navy for failing to sound the tsunami warning. officials here say if they had, hundreds of lives might have been saved. david wright, abc news, santiago, chile. >> our jeffrey kofman was able
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to travel from santiago to the epicenter of the destruction. >> reporter: at dawn we left santiago, heading south in surprisingly normal traffic. our first obstacle, a collapsed bridge built to withstand an earthquake. clearly, it didn't. it wasn't until we arrived in curico, an inland city 25 miles south of santiago, that we saw the first extensive damage. this was a 180-year-old building that housed the local newspaper. managing editor raul parides scrambled inside to show us saturday's paper that was being printed as the quake hit. miraculously, no one was hurt. this was much, much worse than the great earthquake of 1960, he says. when this one hit, i couldn't stay on my feet. up the street we found long lines at the banks. people desperate to get cash. and we couldn't help noticing a teary-eyed andrea. she told us she had been at her home in a tiny coastal village when the quake shocked her and her son from their sleep.
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we ran from the house, she says. just as a wave 30 feet high came and washed it into the ocean, with no warning. that wave was a tsunami. as we left town, we passed this truck, ominously filled with coffins. the owner told us he had an order for 46, and many more would follow. the coffins were heading south and so were we. to the city of talca in the wine region. as we approached, evidence of the quake's violence was everywhere. cracked pavement, downed bridges. we also saw an impressive amount of repair work already under way. we found mothers and children lined up for the first bottles of drinking water since saturday. we need food too, she says. in talca we found buildings ripped apart like toys in the hands of an impetuous child. more than 100 people died in this city. sergio arroyo's pub is still standing but the sunlight pouring through the structure means it clearly cannot be saved. he says he is devastated but
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determined. we will rebuild somewhere else, he says, and reopen. jeffrey kofman, abc news, talca, chile. other news this morning, russia is signaling a new willingness to back sanctions against iran over its nuclear ambitions. in paris yesterday, russian president medvedev says he is considering new sanctions on iran if it continues defying international demands to drop its nuclear program. russia has traditionally opposed sanctions against iran and the u.s. of course has always supported them. in california a consumer group has filed a lawsuit against that state's largest for-profit health insurer. the suit claims that anthem blue cross has violated a california law requiring insurers to offer comparable coverage when a policy is closed. it also claims the plaintiffs were pushed to accept new policies offering fewer benefits. no comment from anthem blue cross. there is a new glimmer of hope for democratic efforts of passing health care reform. at least nine house democrats are indicating they may change
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their votes on reform legislation from no to yes. that is according to an associated press survey. t.j. winick is in washington with more. good morning, t.j. >> reporter: good morning, jeremy and vinita. at some point tomorrow we should know more about how the president would like to proceed on health care reform. democrats face another crucial week on reform this week. after last week's bipartisan summit, president obama's expected to lay out his final strategy on how democrats want to proceed this wednesday. republicans are already assuming senate democrats will pass health care reform with the help of a controversial budget reconciliation rule which would only require 51 votes. >> you're going to have an outraged country. you're going to have a messy process. then you're going to finish the year with a big effort to repeal it. >> reporter: speaker nancy pelosi believes she has the votes to pass the president's proposal in the house. >> it will be a much smaller proposal than we had in the house bill because that's where
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we can gain consensus. >> reporter: she may not be there yet. a majority of 216 votes looks like it will be necessary. and though 220 house members voted for even more comprehensive reform last november, there has been a death and resignation since, not to mention a loss of public support. the house leadership must also appeal to retiring democrats, fiscally conservative democrats, and democrats expected to lose re-election this november if they are to successfully pass the president's proposal. jeremy and vinita? the man accused of kidnapping elizabeth smart almost eight years ago could finally face a jury. a judge in utah ruled brian david mitchell is faking mental illness and is competent to stand trial. a court date could be set by the end of the month. smart was just 14 when she was taken from her salt lake city bedroom. time now for a look at your tuesday forecast. a stormy day in the southeast today with winds topping 40 miles an hour. severe weather in florida.
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rain into the carolina coasts. a wintry mix from georgia to and that pushes into the mid-atlantic by tonight. rain and mountai california up to the pacific >> 57 in salt lake city 55 in be. 75 in phoenix. 30s from minneapolis to detroit. 43 in boston and new york. atlanta only gets up to 38. well, we all know the sort of fashions that elvis was famous for. this is a look at some of the other stuff that was in his closet. no blinged-out jumpsuits here or blue suede shoes to be found. >> take a look at this. it's a new exhibit at graceland. it has put elvis' off-stage duds on display. it's an array of late '60s, early '70s fashion, including his everyday leisure suits. poofy, custom-tailored shirts, ties and plenty of crushed velvet. >> velvet and elvis, they go together. there's also a couple of the king's guns. also an 11-carat diamond ring. one thing you won't find in the closet, jeans. word is elvis didn't like to wear jeans because they reminded him of being poor.
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how about that. >> very interesting. >> he was proud. >> a lot of those duds are back in fashion, too. >> i'd like some of those. >> we'll be right back with more "world news now." assistance getting around their homes. there is a medicare benefit that may qualify you for a new power chair or scooter at little to no cost to you. stay tuned for this important medicare benefit information and free scooter guarantee. imagine... one scooter or power chair that could improve your may entitle you to pay little to nothing to own it. one company that can make it all happen ... your power chair will be paid in full. the scooter store. why should you call the scooter store today? because their mobility experts are also medicare experts. and that means the scooter store is your best shot at qualifying for a scooter that costs you little to nothing. hi i'm doug harrison.
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firefighters in detroit learned a difficult lesson after parking a fire engine on some train tracks. they were responding to a minor traffic accident yesterday when they parked the rig on a railroad crossing. moments later an amtrak train struck the fire engine. one firefighter was slightly hurt but no amtrak passengers were injured. >> somebody's getting suspended without pay i'll bet. >> bad idea. youtube has turned another ordinary person into a sensation. a scottish bicycle repairman's stunt posted online has changed his life. >> daredevil bike rider danny mccaskill's pastime turned into a career. here's nick watt.
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>> reporter: danny mccaskill was a bike mechanic from scotland. then he posted a five-minute, 38-second clip on you tube. ♪ >> reporter: within hours, danny's phone was ringing. millions watched this. >> i never had a goal at all to be a professional. all sorts of things. which might have made me money but i don't want to end up, you know, looking like an idiot. >> reporter: instead, he has appeared in rock videos.
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and tv commercials. like this one for volkswagen. danny's story begins on the remote isle of skye, coast of scotland, aged 4. he started pulling tricks. >> i got my basics. summer holidays. >> by the police? >> yeah, by the police. >> reporter: when he left school danny moved to the highlands and then to edinburgh to share an apartment with a guy named dave. >> summer 2008, dave fell riding bmx and broke his leg. once he was casted he offered to do some filming with me. >> reporter: they got carried away and spent six months over a scottish winter making this clip. sunny days they filmed. rainy days danny scoped locations. >> everything i look at, you know, i kind of look at the world, definitely. everything you look at you think, what could you do on your bike?
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it seems kind of normal to me. quite a lot of the things i've done on my lunch breaks at work. >> reporter: my favorite, danny rode his bike off the roof of the store where he worked. before the internet turned him into a pro biker, brought him a sponsorship deal that allows him now to ride full-time. >> i can really come up with dreams. really come up with whatever i want to. and we can play and actually try these things, you know. >> reporter: danny has left his old life and his old job behind. but not his roommate. dave is still his cameraman. i'm nick watt in edinburgh. >> now that i see him, he might be a little young for subo. >> yes, for susan boyle, you're probably right. >> he's a really interesting guy in the sense he also is really selective about where he'll allow his work to be seen. for example he had an offer to go on ellen degeneres.
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he didn't really know who she was so he turned it down. he also had an opportunity to join a circus in korea, he said no to that as well. >> i guess our chances of booking him are slim as well. >> i have a feeling if he hasn't heard of ellen he may not have heard of us. >> and we don't have any money so there's that. >> there's that also. when we come back the next round of 11 competitors on "dancing with the stars." >> and big news, vinita's appearance on the debut of the new jay leno "tonight show."
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you know, president bush went to visit dick cheney on friday. and i think president bush was preparing for the worst. you see him pull up in front of cheney's house? they did a story on it, take a look. >> former president george w. bush stopped by to see dick cheney yesterday at the former
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vice president's virginia home. it's the first time the two met since leaving the white house more than a year ago. >> the debut edition of the new tonight show and our own vinita nair makes an appearance. >> can i tell you i was watching that upstairs in my office. i wanted to see what leno had to say, i wanted to hear the monologue. i saw myself and i thought, oh, i must have turned the station. i was so oblivious to the fact that i could possibly be on tv. >> i think he has a crush on you, they use you a lot. >> i hope so. maybe i'll be the leno anchor. that will be my segue, my next job. >> okay, you heard it here first. >> probably not. okay. let's talk about leno because that was the big story. after nine months he of course returned from primetime back to late night. and i have to say he really didn't spend too much time talking about all that was going on. of course now he's head to head against letterman again. something that they have seen
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back in 1993, they were first pitted against each other. take a listen to one funny thing leno had to say on the show last night. >> thank you very much. it's good to be home, good to be home, kev. i'm jay leno, your host, at least for a while. got to admit i'm a little bit nervous. not because it's my first night back. because i know dave and oprah are watching. that's right, that's right. >> of course that was a reference to that super bowl ad so many of us saw. letterman also, of course, he had so much time to joke about this whole transition. he also had a couple of jokes on his show last night. take a listen. >> thank you very much. welcome to "the late show." my name is dave letterman. same time, same host. got to tell you something, tonight is a rough night for my mom. she doesn't know who to watch, jimmy kimmel or jay. >> all in all that was pretty much it. they didn't have much to say about the return. >> critics were saying it's the same old thing with leno, like
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he never really left, the nine months just oblivious, just a big sort of void. >> he is back behind a desk. remember? he didn't have a desk for primetime. that desk you see there is a new desk. a big brouhaha, how exciting, a new desk. >> jamie foxx spilled water all over it. it looks like. might have to get another one. >> not sure what he was doing in that cene >> the chicken walk it looks like. some other big television news, of course we now know who's going to be on "dancing with the stars." we're all waiting with bated breath. let's get right to the list. men first if you will. a very subtle guy is topping the men's list, chad ochocinco. understated i'm sure he'll be on that show. also evan lysacek, the big olympics star. buzz aldrin, the astronaut. aiden turner. who i'm told is on a soap opera. jake pavelka who i guess last night proposed to his lady on "the bachelor." now the wo an interesting mix of women. pamela anderson and the twins will be there.
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erin andrews coming along too. shannen doherty. niecy nash from "reno 911." kate gosselin coming as well. i don't know if the kids are or not. and nicole scherzinger from the pussycat dolls. but a re-think-- with lunesta. u don't need a r- lunesta is different. it keys into receptors that support sleep, setting your sleep process in motion. lunesta helps you get the restful sleep you need. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving or engaging in other activities while asleep without remembering it the next day have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness and morning drowsiness. stop fighting with your sleep. get a free 7-night trial on-line and ask your doctor
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here's some stories to watch today here on abc news. as senators investigate toyota's response to recent historic recalls on capitol hill today the automaker announces buyer incentives on slow-selling cars. president obama will be in savannah, georgia, today where he'll meet with local business leaders and workers. they'll share ideas about the economy. two american missionaries still in custody in haiti accused of child trafficking might be allowed to go home today after a court hearing. eight others have already been released. finally this half hour, how one family headed by an innovative grandmother turned a personal struggle into a way to help many others. >> this grandmother found no roadblock in her quest to help a special needs grandson. >> reporter: for donna and dennis spiegel, raising their
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grandson has been a journey of love and heartbreak. >> the diagnosis is devastating. just to hear cerebral palsy and not being in the special needs world, you're not even sure what it is. then you hear he isn't going to walk, he's not going to talk. >> reporter: for dayton, once a week physical therapy did little. >> in an appointment thinking, i'm not helping this child, i'm not getting anywhere. >> reporter: then donna heard about something called conductive education. intensive daily therapy designed to connect mind and muscle. >> if you wanted to be a great tennis player, golfer, you wouldn't take one hour a week lessons. you're trying to each teach these children to set up or feed themselves or walk. it's not going to happen with 40 minutes a week. >> reporter: it seemed impossible. the closest school was hours away. so this grandmother decided to build her own school. she began with the proceeds of her business. this chain of consignment stores. why were you so driven to do this? >> because i love him so much. >> reporter: that love helped unlock a flood of generosity. a donated building.
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a contractor working for free. shoppers helped too. >> customers came in and painted, stripped off wallpaper. people are wonderful. you just ask and they're there. >> reporter: and they keep coming. >> okay, let's shop! >> reporter: by the busload. for the bargains, and to help the children. ten students now attend this special school. including donna's grandson, who at the age of 7 started to walk. >> and he just took off and walked down the aisle and was, you know -- talk about not having a dry eye in the place. >> reporter: a grandmother's power to change the future for children. >> i didn't have any hope. i didn't know where life was going to go for dayton or for us. and now i just see happy days. >> reporter: barbara pinto, abc news, cincinnati. >> what a remarkable lady. >> absolutely. that is the news for this half hour. we want to encourage you to become one of our fans on facebook.
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